Roger Waters’ Black Fender Stratocaster

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During the “Us and Them” Tour, Roger has been playing what appears to be a vintage Fender Stratocaster on a few tracks. There isn’t much information online, but it’s clearly a well-worn instrument, which if it’s a genuine Fender, suggests either a custom shop model or a real vintage instrument. There doesn’t seem to be a CS logo in pictures, so my bet would be on the latter.

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The small headstock and Transition logo suggest a 60’s instrument, earlier than the large headstock came in (very late ’65). To my knowledge, Fender don’t produce anything like this guitar at the moment.

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Andy Fairweather Low’s Stratocasters

401px-Andy_Fairweather-LowIn his career as one of the most reputable session guitarists in the world*, Andy Fairweather Low has used many different guitars. From the late eighties/early nineties, as a part of Eric Clapton’s (and in 1991, George Harrison’s) band, he used Eric Clapton signature guitars with Lace Sensors almost exclusively, but he has since stated in interviews

“I never got on with the lace sensor pickups. I found some old humbuckers and actually, some new P90s. I like the sound they make.”

I have yet to see any evidence of his P90 guitars, but for a long period beginning in the late nineties, he was often seen with some Eric Clapton Strat’s, heavily modified with these Humbuckers.

There is little more to be said about these guitars, except that he appears to have had at least five different versions, two each in Black and Olympic White, fitted with either one or two Humbuckers, and a red version with three, as seen at the ‘Concert for George’ .

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For anyone interested in seeing and hearing his Black Strat in action, check out his amazing solo in ‘Money’ from Roger Waters’ ‘In the Flesh – Live’ DVD.

 

*Andy has played with the likes of Bob Dylan, Roger Waters, Eric Clapton, George Harrison, Elton John, Jimi Hendrix, David Crosby, The Band, Richard and Linda Thompson, Dave Gilmour, The Who and Pete Townshend, BB King, Joe Cocker, Steve Winwood, Donald ‘Duck’ Dunn, Jimmy Page, Ronnie Lane, Linda Ronstadt, Roddy Frame, Emmylou Harris, Joe Satriani, the Bee Gees, Jeff Beck, The Impressions, Lonnie Donegan, Ringo Starr, Steve Gadd, David Sanborn, Benmont Tench, Warren Zevon, Charlie Watts, Mary J. Blige, Dave Edmunds, Georgie Fame, Bonnie Raitt, Otis Rush, Phil Collins, Van Morrison, Gerry Rafferty, Chris Rea, Buddy Guy, Chris Barber, Jackson Browne, Bill Wyman and Sheryl Crow, amongst others.

George’s Bangladesh Stratocaster (Update)

I recently saw this video of John Lennon and George Harrison recording John’s ‘How Do You Sleep’, and noticed an interesting footnote to my earlier post about the Bangladesh Concert Strat.

It seems George’s Strat of choice for the sessions was very likely the Bangladesh Strat before it was sanded to it’s natural finish.

Let’s take a look at the info we have.

  • The Bangladesh Concert took place in August of 1971, recording on Lennon’s ‘Imagine’ (on which ‘How do You Sleep’ appears) finished by early July of the same year. Consistent with George having time to strip the finish between the two.
  • The sonic blue Strat in the video has a maple neck, and a mint green 3 ply pickguard, an uncommon combination indicating it comes from the crossover period between Fenders white single ply, maple neck combination and the rosewood boards which were to become standard later. The Bangladesh Strat shares these features.
  • The Strat isn’t set up for slide at the CFB as this one is here, but it would be when George taped his Dick Cavett Show performance on Nov 23 with the sanded Bangladesh Strat, so George was known to use it for slide, and seems to have favoured the instrument during this period.
  • The spacing of the 12th fret markers on the fretboard is consistent between both.
  • This Strat has the same strap as the Bangladesh Strat.

So, if my suspicions are accurate. Not only have we identified that the CFB Strat was originally sonic blue, we’ve determined that the finish was stripped between George’s recording sessions for ‘Imagine’ (probably ending early July) and the final CFB rehearsal on July 31!

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Guitar of the Day 06/12/2015

Snowy White’s Gibson Les Paul Goldtop.

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Many people know Snowy from his work in other bands such as Thin Lizzy, or for his work with Pink Floyd and Roger Waters over the years. Whether in his capacity as a backup guitarist or as a solo performer in his own right, his Goldtop was always by his side.

The instrument has undergone many changes, some of which are:

  • New Wiring
  • New Bridge (Gift from Peter Green)
  • Refret
  • Out of phase pickup selection. (Originally via a toggle switch on the back, now changed to a pull/push pot in the bridge tone position.

After 45 years of service with Snowy, the guitar was auctioned in early 2015, selling for almost US$95,000.

Premier Guitar did a fantastic interview with Snowy (as well as the other guitarists) during Roger Waters’ “The Wall Live” tour, as part of their “Rig Rundown” series, which you can find here.

Guitar of the Day 27/11/2015

George Harrison’s Bangladesh Stratocaster

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In the prevailing mood of my week, I’m going to continue with another George-related post.

Not much information is available on this Strat as George, to my knowledge, was only once seen publicly with it outside the Bangladesh concert and rehearsals. This was when he played slide on it during the performance of the song “Two-Faced Man” by Gary Wright and the Wonder Wheel on Dick Cavett’s show, before giving a lengthy interview.

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The guitar appears to be a late-fifties to early sixties model Fender Strat, as it has a transitional combination of a maple neck and a 3-ply pickguard.

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Since George rarely talks about acquiring new Stratocasters, it’s possible (but by no means confirmed) that this guitar was the one gifted to him by Clapton when the latter was in the process of building “Blackie”. Clapton brought back six Strats from a US tour and gave one each to George, Pete Townshend and Steve Winwood, taking the best parts of the remaining three and putting them together to make “Blackie”.

According to George, he personally stripped the finish from this Strat accounting for it’s bare wood appearance. He later claims to have given the stripped Bangladesh Strat to Spike Milligan, who identified a sunburst Fender as the bangladesh Strat during a later interview , suggesting a refinish.

This post has an interesting part 2 HERE.

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George Harrison’s Beatle Guitars

George Harrison owned and played many guitars in his career, particularly in his time after The Beatles, when he amassed a sizeable collection. This post simply aims to catalogue the important electric guitars George used during the Beatle days, with a little information about each.

Please note, there are a couple of items missing from the list, because their importance in Beatle history is negligible or debatable, such as the Coral Sitar-Guitar or Gretsch custom 12-string which George owned in the 60’s. Additionally, the guitars are not necessarily presented in the order they found favour with George.

Futurama.

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Bought on hire-purchase beginning November 1959. George’s first Beatle guitar. Eventually, George gave this guitar up as a prize to a Beatle fan competition.

Gretsch Duo Jet.

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George’s “first good guitar”. His Gretsch Duo Jet is a 1957 model, bought in 1961 in Liverpool second-hand.  This was his main guitar through the Hamburg and Cavern Club days, and he took it to America and Europe with him when touring in 1964.

Gretsch Country Gentleman.

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In 1963, George acquired his first Gretsch Country Gentleman, owning a second before the year was through. The two models are almost indistinguishable from each other apart from the different methods of strung muting. His first employed a pair of “screw down” mutes either side of the Bridge, while the second, a newer model, was fitted with “flip up” mutes, which could be activated by switches placed in the same position.

Rickenbacker 425.

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George picked up a Rickenbacker 425 when visiting his sister in the US in 1963. Although he didn’t use it as much as his other Rickenbackers, he liked it enough to have a second pickup installed later.

Maton.

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1963 was a good year for George’s guitar collection. He picked up a Maton while one of his Country Gents was being repaired, and retained it for at least a few shows.

Gretsch Tennessean.

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During their run of Christmas shows in 1963/64, George gained a Gretsch Tennessean. He would use this guitar prominently through 1964/65.

Rickenbacker 12 strings.

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George Playing his Casino. The original Rickenbacker 12 string lies on the table, the newer model is in the foreground.

In 1964/65, George would acquire two Rickenbacker 12 strings. The first with a flat top and front and back binding, and the second with rounded contours and binding on the rear only. It appears (visible in the third image above) that the contoured model had a stereo output, while the earlier one had a regular single output jack.

Fender Stratocaster “Rocky”.

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During the recording of the “Help!” album in 1965, George and John each bought near identical sonic blue Fender Stratocasters (they would later both use them to record the solo on “Nowhere Man” in unison). George’s would later receive a handsome paint job and the name “Rocky”, becoming one of his most famous guitars after it’s appearance in the Magical Mystery Tour film.

Epiphone Casino.

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After admiring the Epiphone Casino Paul bought the previous year, John and George each acquired their own in 1966. All three were easily distinguishable by different bridges or tremolos, and Paul’s had an older-style headstock shape.

Gibson ES-345

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In late 1965, George was reportedly loaned a Gibson ES-345 by one of the Moody Blues, after one of his Country Gentlemen was lost off the back of a car between gigs. Whether the loan is a fiction or not, he certainly used one around this period, but not for long, and although it appears in a surprisingly large number of clips and live performances given it’s time frame, he seems to have either ditched it or given it back. Perhaps consistently with the fact that it wasn’t actually his, It’s also rumoured that he never recorded with it.

Gibson SG.

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George bought a new guitar for the “Revolver” sessions. A humbucker-fitted Gibson SG with a Vibrola tremolo system. Perhaps influenced by Eric Clapton’s use of a similar guitar at the time. This guitar would share the position of George’s favourite guitar with his Stratocaster, until it was replaced by a gift from Clapton himself…

Gibson Les Paul “Lucy”.

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In 1968, Eric Clapton returned from a trip to the US with a gift for George; A Cherry red Gibson Les Paul, which George named “Lucy” after redheaded actress Lucille Ball. This guitar would replace the SG, which became unused and was given by George to Pete Ham of the band Badfinger. “Lucy” would find it’s way back into Clapton’s hands (briefly) when he used it to record the guitar solo on “While my Guitar Gently Weeps” for the White Album sessions. Used heavily for George’s remaining time with the group, it would also later provide the lead sounds (under George’s fingertips) for (amongst others) the song “Something” on Abbey Road.

Fender Rosewood Telecaster.

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Finally, in 1969 Fender gave George a prototype all-rosewood Telecaster. This became his main guitar for the Let it Be sessions (making history as George’s instrument for the infamous rooftop concert at the film’s climax) and likely found it’s way onto Abbey Road as well.

 

Guitar of the Day 17/09/2015

Eric Clapton’s “Gold Leaf” Stratocaster.

0f23363e27ba4169781f42cd6bac7774On the advent of Fender’s 50th anniversary in 1996, the company called Eric Clapton and asked if he wanted anything special to mark the occasion. He asked for a gold leaf strat, with 23 carat gold hardware (as well as his usual lace sensor gold pickups). In May of that year, Fender delivered.
The guitar can be seen at the “Music for Montserrat” concert, which featured Sting, Mark Knopfler, Paul McCartney and Elton John, as well as Eric. It also went on to be the main guitar on Clapton’s 1997 tour of Korea and Japan, and the main guitar on his 13th studio album Pilgrim (1998).

It is also interesting to note that following his use of this guitar on the slide parts on the Pilgrim album, Eric continued to use lace sensor gold-equipped strats for slide parts live and on record, even following his switch to Fender noiseless pickups in his personal and signature models. This remained the case until 2010, when his slide guitars were changed to Fender Noiseless as well.

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